Hernias!!

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Eastfields
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Hernias!!

Post by Eastfields » Thu Jun 21, 2012 4:49 pm

Just trying to find out a little more about Hernias in kunekunes. I am a little confused.... I have read on here a few people say Hernias ARE hereditry. But i belive i read somewhere else that it is not, and it can be completely random as to wether you have a problem. Basically, my sow has had 2 litters, her 1st we had no hernias in the 6 she had (2 boys) and this time all 3 boys have developed hernias. Obviously will not keep them entire, but got to make the difficult decision wether to have repair done or best to cull them :(
The first litter was by a Te Whangi boar, this litter by a Ru.
Could it be the new boar has the default in genes that causes hernias, or have i just been unlucky this time??
Has anyone else had a high rate of hernias in a litter, but then have success with same parents in another litter? ie. If i put my sow back to same boar (ru) am i likely to have just a bad a problem as i have seen this time?
When i bought the boar, the previous owner had never had a hernia in any of his offspring. So also, can a sow and boar be incompatible!?
A lot questions, but just wondering what to do in future....
Any help/advice appreciated :)

wendy scu
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Re: Hernias!!

Post by wendy scu » Sat Jun 23, 2012 8:12 pm

i have read a few studies on this subject and all have said that yes, it is hereditary and it can be carried in the sow or the boar. when i get them i repair the boys and all my boys have a 'closed' castration regardless of hernias just in case.
i have watched the bloddlines for over 10 years now and although i have a leaning towards thinking it is the Andrew boar who carries it, i have absolutely no scientific evidence to back this up.
sorry not to be of more help. :?

HappyHippy
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Re: Hernias!!

Post by HappyHippy » Sun Jul 21, 2013 12:38 pm

I've been looking into it too - but like Wendy, nothing conclusive :?
I thought it was our original Te Whangi boar who had a problem (it wasn't) I've used other boars (Andrew & Ru) and other sows but haven't found a real difference...
I've read that some people think it's down to the handling of them.... but we've had hernia's in piglets that have never been handled so that kinda rules that out !
We also get a closed castration done on all ours, any that do have hernias are kept entire and run with castrates until they get to a size when we can send them for pork.
HTH

klorinth
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Re: Hernias!!

Post by klorinth » Sun Jul 21, 2013 11:25 pm

This may be a silly question, but which type of hernias are you talking about?

Seeing as you are talking about the boys I am going to assume you are talking about Inguinal and not Umbilical hernias. Umbilical hernias are more likely to be due to handling during and immediately after delivery. Inguinal are different and would have a genetic component.

Is there anywhere inparticular that people would recommend for information on this? Somewhere online?
Our new little farm.

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HappyHippy
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Re: Hernias!!

Post by HappyHippy » Mon Jul 22, 2013 12:27 am

I've not had an umbilical hernia in any of my Kunes (touch wood !) in my pigs case it's scrotial/inguinal hernias we've seen.
I'm afraid i don't know any further sources of info online, others might though....thoughts anyone ?

wendy scu
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Re: Hernias!!

Post by wendy scu » Mon Jul 22, 2013 6:08 am

i was talking about scrotal but have had one umbilical in 12 years of breeding

klorinth
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Re: Hernias!!

Post by klorinth » Tue Jul 23, 2013 4:08 am

By doing the closed castration you are preventing a hernia from forming? There is no hernia to start with.

How do you know if the pair are throwing hernias if you are preventing them from forming?
The papers I was reading yesterday stated that the rates for hernias were estimated to be about 0.6-1.7% of piglets born. Depending on the breed and the line. One also mentioned that the inheretance is from both parents but the predictability based on a known sow was 15% of her offspring.
Our new little farm.

Pigs: Berkshire
Sheep: Shetland, Texel
Chickens: Chantecler, Dark Cornish, Ameraucana
Dogs: Norrbottenspets, Akbash

"Do what you do and improve what you do."

wendy scu
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Re: Hernias!!

Post by wendy scu » Tue Jul 23, 2013 7:41 am

closed castration prevents the hernia from errupting again after castration but the majority of hernias are there and apparent before castration. the closed castration is simply to ensure the ig goes on to have a life if he's not destined for the table, so yes, in short, you would be aware of where its coming from in the breeding.
in my personal experience it has seemed to come through male and female lines. i have brought in new boars and new sows to try to combat it but with not much success. its very hard to breed it out when there is no new blood :(
if it comes through the boar line then as we only started with 4 boars in the UK and these were heavily bred and inbred at the start (some of the earlier pedigrees include only two boars in 4 generations) i fear we are reaping what we sowed

klorinth
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Re: Hernias!!

Post by klorinth » Tue Jul 23, 2013 12:20 pm

Thank you Wendy.
Very interesting.
Our new little farm.

Pigs: Berkshire
Sheep: Shetland, Texel
Chickens: Chantecler, Dark Cornish, Ameraucana
Dogs: Norrbottenspets, Akbash

"Do what you do and improve what you do."

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