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fencing

Posted: Fri Jul 03, 2015 10:23 am
by DGD119
Our fields are currently fenced with regular stock fencing. It's a bit old but it does a good enough job of containing sheep.
I'd like to keep a couple of kunekunes in one of our fields.
Will the stock fencing do the job? If not can I reninforce or improve it in some way? Or do I need new fences?

Re: fencing

Posted: Sat Jul 25, 2015 10:47 pm
by HappyHippy
Unfortunately pigs will tend to test your fences a bit more than sheep. If they've got lots of space/things to keep them amused they're unlikely to try, but if they manage to find a way out you can bet they'll use it regularly or look for other escape routes :?
If the posts are just a little wobbly, you might be able to drive them in a little more and tighten up (or introduce) rads to tension the wire (they're little boxy things that turn the wire and increase tension - only work if the staples holding the fence aren't hammered tight into the post) We run a strand of barbed wire along the bottom of the fence to discourage them from rooting under. If the fences are really shot, you might be safer running electric tape (2 strands) around the inside of the fences - keep it 6-8 inches in front of the existing fence and it'll stop them scratching on your posts. A good mains or leisure battery set up is around £100 - not cheap, but cheaper than re-fencing :wink:
Hope that helps,
Karen

Re: fencing

Posted: Wed Jul 29, 2015 12:52 pm
by repatexpat
Any advice for a non-traumatic way to introduce a young pig (3.5 months) to electric fence (white wire rope). She'll be in with two 10 month old pigs that are deeply respectful (won't cross where there has been rope previously!) of the voltage.

TIA!
V

Re: fencing

Posted: Wed Jul 29, 2015 3:16 pm
by HappyHippy
I'd make a small training pen (6ft square or thereabouts, it doesn't need to be big) make the sides solid (pallets are a great way to do it) inside this run a strand of tape or rope around 6 inches high inside it. When they touch the wire they'll have to go backwards away from the solid partition - a couple of hours, with close supervision should see them respecting the fence.
HTH
Kx

Re: fencing

Posted: Wed Jul 29, 2015 3:43 pm
by repatexpat
Thanks, Karen! In the absence of pallets, if the goal is to have a visual barrier, do you think it would work to make an enclosure with hurdles, draping these with opaque cloth/plastic? If, however, the outer structure needs to be impervious to pigs, I'll have to figure out an alternative (hurdles not being designed to keep pigs, or at least not my sow, in!).
Cheers! V

Re: fencing

Posted: Wed Jul 29, 2015 6:42 pm
by HappyHippy
If it's a youngster you might get away with hurdles...
Link/tie them together and stake them into the ground to add rigidity - tent pegs would probably do if you didn't have anything else. Cardboard/fabric to line might work (haven't tried them myself, having an abundance of pallets :wink: ) Try it and see how you go, I'd guess cardboard would maybe work better?
The other option is to lift/hold the pig and direct their snout to the wire or tape. The only issue with this is that the pig may associate you with the shock rather than the fence and you would also get shocked.......sharing the pain :shock:
Kx

Re: fencing

Posted: Thu Apr 21, 2016 9:18 am
by repatexpat
New plants in the garden so it's now imperative that the youngest pigs are trained to electric fence so that we can rope off a grazing area below vegetables. I'm concerned about associating a new area with the learning experience (they then might not want to venture out?) so is it best to erect the training pen within the familiarity of their current pen or might that have other problems? Thanks for tips!